Parapet Walls Utility Solutions

A parapet wall is a low wall, usually enclosing a roof, or a protective barrier at the edge of a terrace or on the side of a bridge. In modern use, one is constructed to provide a barrier to prevent people or objects from falling from the edge of the structure and to slow the spread of fire; in earlier times, these walls were built to afford some protection for rooftop defenders of a structure, such as a castle or city walls, under attack.


Equipment screens are designed to hide unwanted views and increase security of mechanical systems, HVAC equipment, trash enclosures, parking garages and other applications.

Bracing of stacks, flues & parapets

roof-wallsSometimes a stack or flue extends quite a distance above the plane of a roof and needs to be braced against wind and snow. In this example, a rigid brace was attached to the flue, and then the roof using S-5! clamps. Be sensible with these kinds of installations. Loads incurred by S-5! clamps will be transferred to the panels and their attachment to the structure. Very large or tall stacks or flues may require bracing to the building structure in order to lend adequate support.

Here, a parapet wall extends a short distance above the roof line. The kicker bracing serves to stabilize the parapet. It’s attached to the panel seam with S-5! clamps. Clamps were located at panel clip locations. Use caution with this kind of installation, as the load incurred by the brace and clamp is transferred to the panel system. In the pictured example, the wall is relatively low in height. Taller walls may be subject to a greater tributary area and wind loads. When in doubt, consult the panel system supplier.

Often, a small equipment screen is desired to hide rooftop equipment. Anchorage of such a screen is always a problem. The diagram shows how simple it can be with S-5! clamps. Exercise discretion with respect to the height of such a screen. The taller it is, the more wind to which it is exposed. These loads will be transferred to the panels.

flues_3